Politics

French Magazine Charlie Hebdo Publishes Defiant Response To Terrorists (Photos)

| by Robert Fowler
A Pile Of Condolences For Charlie Hebdo After The January AttackA Pile Of Condolences For Charlie Hebdo After The January Attack

The French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo has published its first issue since the Nov. 13 Paris attack, and it’s a doozy.

Having previously been victims of terrorism, the magazine team has responded to the act of terror with a defiant cover illustration that celebrates France’s unapologetic love for partying.

The cartoon features a French man sipping on champagne with one hand and holding a frothing bottle in the other. The bubbly leaks out from his bullet-riddled body, a darkly comedic touch that Charlie Hebdo is known for.

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The headline translation:

“They’ve got the weapons. F— them, we’ve got the champagne!”

The cover sends a clear message that the French people will not be cowed by terrorism. The Islamic State group had described the European nation as “the capital of prostitution and obscenity,” Breitbart reports.

Clearly, Charlie Hebdo and the French people plan to wear that accusation as a badge of honor.

The French magazine is known worldwide for its pitch-black sense of humor. It has been an equal-opportunity offender, mocking politicians from all countries and religious icons.

The offices of Charlie Hebdo had been targeted by Al Qaeda after publishing the likeness of the Prophet Muhammed. On Jan. 7, 2015, gunmen infiltrated the magazine’s offices and killed 12 people, Business Insider reports.

The world was horrified by the attack, people on social media offering their support with the phrase “Je suis Charlie,” which translated into “I am Charlie,” according to Business Insider.

The newly published magazine cover was illustrated by political artist Corinne Rey, also known by the pen name Coco, Tech Insider reports.

Rey had been present during the attacks on Charlie Hebdo’s offices and had been forced at gunpoint into helping the terrorists enter the building, according to Tech Insider.

Sources: Breitbart, Business Insider, Tech Insider / Photo Credit: Aurelien Guichard / Flickr, Twitter