Politics

U.S. Soldier Comes Out Against U.S. Military in Syria (Video)

| by Michael Allen
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Pictures of purported U.S. service members who oppose possible U.S. military intervention in Syria have popped up on Twitter over the past few weeks.

The pictures claim to be U.S. Soldiers holding signs such as: “Stay out of Syria.” and “I will not fight for Al Qaeda in Syria.”

The pentagon claims that similar photos were posted on the U.S. Marine Corps web site, but dismissed their authenticity.

“We believe the photos are illegitimate,” U.S. Marine Corps spokesman Lt. Col. Neil Murphy told ABC News on Monday.

However, a man who identifies himself as U.S. Soldier Evan Klocinski recently appeared on the Internet conspiracy TV show Infowars.com to explain why he opposes U.S. intervention in Syria, even though he has served in Iraq and is preparing to deploy to Afghanistan.

Klocinski said he joined the "#IDidn'tJoin" movement on Twitter because serving in Syria would mean supporting Al Qaeda (video below).

"I came upon a posting from the 'Alex Jones Show' and it was about '#IDidn'tJoin.' I saw that other service members willing to stick their necks out on the line and stand up for what they believe in. It's pivotal and critical for those of us in the service to let our leaders know, 'Hey what you're doing isn't right,'" said Klocinski.

Klocinski later went on to state: "In Iraq and Afghanistan, we fought insurgents and the Taliban, and most importantly Al Qaeda. And there are Al Qaeda in Syria and apparently we're supporting them. So I'm going to fight them in one country and help them in another. It doesn't make sense. Why would anyone with a shred of common sense think that was an okay thing to do?"

While there are some Al Qaeda-linked Syrian rebels, Klocinski failed to mention that Iraq is rife with corruption today, with billions of U.S. dollars unaccounted for, noted CBC.ca.

He also did not mention that Afghanistan President Karzai has been linked to political corruption, the opium drug trade (via his brother), electoral fraud and bribery.

Klocinski, who praised himself for speaking out, later attacked another U.S. soldier who spoke out in support of U.S. military intervention in Syria.

Source: Wikipedia.org, CBC.ca, ABC News, YouTube