Fox & Friends Slam Obama for Doubting Failed War Started by Bush (Video)

| by Michael Allen

Fox & Friends slammed President Obama this morning over claims made by former US Secretary of Defense Robert Gates in his new memoir, Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War.

In the book, Gates says he was disheartened that President Obama began lose faith in America's longest war, Afghanistan.

No country has ever conquered Afghanistan, but Gates was disappointed that President Obama was not more supportive beyond supplying 30,000 additional troops and hundreds of millions of dollars.

According to Mother Jones, Gates wrote: “As I sat there, I thought: The president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy and doesn’t consider the war to be his. For him, it’s all about getting out.”

The Washington Post said that Gates later praised Obama's decisions on Afghanistan: “I believe Obama was right in each of these decisions.”

But the hosts of Fox & Friends were appalled that President Obama doubted the failed war started by President Bush, noted Mediaite.com (video below).

“We’re not talking about Iraq,” complained Brian Kilmeade. “We’re talking about Afghanistan!”

“The good war,” added Steve Doocy, who failed to mention that Al Qaeda left Afghanistan by 2002, noted The Guardian.

“Essentially the president got pinned to the mat by his own statements to get elected in 2008,” Kilmeade stated. “He’s saying the president okayed 40,000 troops into Afghanistan, not believing it would be successful! How do you feel if you’re the family of a soldier? Whatever you think of President Bush, don’t think for a second he put a soldier into battle that he didn’t think was there for the right reason or to be successful.”

Elisabeth Hasselbeck then blamed Obama for somehow hurting the troops with an imaginary "trickle-down effect."

“Every person serving felt he was with them all the way, for the most part," said Hasselbeck. "Here this trickle-down effect to the troops is disheartening, to say the least.”

Sources: Mediaite.com, The Washington Post, Mother Jones, The Guardian