Politics

Dozens of CIA Operatives in Benghazi During Attack, Says CNN (Video)

| by Michael Allen
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Dozens of CIA operatives were reportedly in Benghazi, Libya on September 11, 2012 when four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens, were killed in a terrorist attack.

According to CNN, unidentified sources claim that up to 35 people working for the CIA were on the ground that night, but their mission is unknown (video below).

Some CIA operatives are frequently forced to take polygraph tests to find out if any them are talking to the media or Congress about Benghazi. There are also reports of intimidation of CIA employees who want to speak to Congress about Benghazi.

"Agency employees typically are polygraphed every three to four years. Never more than that," said former CIA operative Robert Baer told CNN.

"If somebody is being polygraphed every month, or every two months it's called an issue polygraph, and that means that the polygraph division suspects something, or they're looking for something, or they're on a fishing expedition. But it's absolutely not routine at all to be polygraphed monthly, or bi-monthly."

However, CIA spokesman Dean Boyd said in a statement: "CIA employees are always free to speak to Congress if they want. The CIA enabled all officers involved in Benghazi the opportunity to meet with Congress. We are not aware of any CIA employee who has experienced retaliation, including any non-routine security procedures, or who has been prevented from sharing a concern with Congress about the Benghazi incident."

If true, this news will no doubt fuel the GOP conspiracy theories about Benghazi and the Obama administration.

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"I think it is a form of a cover-up, and I think it's an attempt to push it under the rug, and I think the American people are feeling the same way," said Rep. Frank Wolf (R-Va.).

"Initially [CIA operatives] were not afraid to come forward. They wanted the opportunity, and they wanted to be subpoenaed, because if you're subpoenaed, it sort of protects you, you're forced to come before Congress. Now that's all changed."

Source: CNN