Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's Father Allegedly Sent Out Tweets To The Taliban

| by Dominic Kelly

Bob Bergdahl, the father of U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, reportedly tweeted pro-Taliban sentiments while his son was being kept as a prisoner of war in Afghanistan.

According to reports, Bob Bergdahl wanted to do whatever was necessary to get his son back, so he decided to establish communication with the Taliban. At various points during his son’s imprisonment, Bob took to Twitter to try to get on the organization’s good side.

“I am still working to free all Guantanamo prisoners,” Bob Bergdahl tweeted at the “Voice of Jihad” account. “God will repay for the death of every Afghan child, amen!”

Since the tweets were discovered, the account has been deleted, and even though his motives may have been to get his son home, the discovery could not have come at a worse time. Now that Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has returned home, many are claiming that he deserted his fellow troops.

A 2010 investigation determined that at the time of his 2009 disappearance, when he was only 23, Bergdahl left his comrades behind in an effort to try and peacefully talk to the enemy. Sgt. Evan Buetow, who was on Bergdahl’s team at the time of his disappearance, says that his disappearance was less than sincere.

“He's not a great person or great example of a solider,” said Buetow. “He deserted his men, put us in danger so he could find the Taliban. And several soldiers died looking for him in the weeks and months to follow.”

Buetow is not alone, as many are now alleging that Bergdahl is nothing more than a traitor. A Facebook group called “Bowe Bergdahl is NOT a Hero!” already has over 10,000 members.

Still, the White House has refused to comment on the specifics of his disappearance or the apparent pro-Taliban tweets his father sent out during the five-year imprisonment, telling the Daily News, “Our sacred obligation to bring home our service members is rock solid. No tweet could ever affect that."

Sources: NY Daily News, Daily Mail, The Washington Post