Politics

Trump Slams Polls That Claim Travel Ban Is Unpopular

| by John Freund

President Donald Trump continued his war with the media when he tweeted on Feb. 6 that any polls showing his immigration ban as unpopular are simply "fake news." 

Fox News reports the Trump tweet is an attempt to ratchet up support for his travel ban, which has since been lifted by a federal judge who declared the ban unconstitutional. That decision was held up by an appeals court. Trump has vowed to continue to fight until the ban is reinstated, and has ordered the Justice Department to pursue further legal action until his executive order can be implemented. 

In the meantime, a CNN/ORC poll found that 6 in 10 people opposed Trump's planned wall on the Mexican border, and that 53 percent of respondents said they opposed the travel ban order.  

In response to those numbers, Trump tweeted, "Any negative polls are fake news, just like the CNN, ABC, NBC polls in the election. Sorry, people want border security and extreme vetting."

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In an apparent attempt to address the rumor that top political aide Steven Bannon is actually the one running the country, Trump tweeted: "I call my own shots, largely based on an accumulation of data, and everyone knows it. Some FAKE NEWS media, in order to marginalize, lies!"

According to CNN, Trump's tweets have sparked outrage from politicians and activists alike. "This is bizarre behavior. Something is not right," tweeted Democratic Rep. Joaquin Castro of Texas.

"'Negative news = fake news' is the beginning of tyranny, tweeted activist Deray McKesson, a prominent Trump critic.

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Trump says that because pollsters mistakenly predicted that the election would be won by Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, they cannot be trusted in further polling. Some, including CNN's Jake Tapper, point out that they were correct about Clinton winning the popular vote, it was their predictions in swing states that were inaccurate.

CNN also noted that Trump would read out favorable poll results on the campaign trail but label those that were unfavoable as "crooked polls."

Sources: Fox News, CNN / Photo credit: Donald J. Trump/Facebook

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