Politics

Rift Widens Between Blue California And Trump

| by Oren Peleg

As late as 1988, California was a reliably Republican state. But in the three decades since, California has come to symbolize a progressive, liberal bastion -- a view solidified by the 2016 presidential election.

California’s 55 Electoral College votes went to Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in the election. But Clinton also held a sizable margin of victory among the popular vote in the state. Clinton won 8.7 million votes in California, or 62.3 percent of the vote, according to the Cook Political Report.

President-elect Donald Trump, Clinton’s Republican competitor, won 31.9 percent of the popular vote. Clinton’s 30.4 percent margin of victory in California is a 7.2 percent increase over the 2012 margin of victory for President Barack Obama.

With the California State Assembly reconvened, Speaker Anthony Rendon addressed the state’s disconnect with the incoming Trump administration.

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“Californians may accept the lawfulness of the November election, but millions of us do not accept the sentiment delivered by this election,” he said, notes The Christian Science Monitor. “Californians do not need healing. We need to fight.”

Democratic California Gov. Jerry Brown tried to soften California’s rhetoric against Trump during a Dec. 5 press conference, notes Politico.

“This is not unusual, there’s always state-federal conflict,” Brown said. “I think we’ll just have to wait to see how ... different issues emerge under the new president.”

Brown has also nominated Democratic Rep. Xavier Becerra, who represents parts of Los Angeles, to become the California's next attorney general.

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“I don’t think California’s out there to pick fights,” Becerra said at the press conference with Brown. “We certainly will stand up for the rights that we do have, and the policies and the initiatives that we have moved forward. We won’t shy away from representing and defending what we stand for as Californians, but we’re not out there to pick fights.”

Sources: Cook Political Report, The Christian Science Monitor, Politico / Photo credit: Steven Straiton/Flickr

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