Politics

Anthony Weiner is Considering a Political Comeback

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According to a recent report, Anthony Weiner, the former Queens congressman who was forced to leave office back in 2011 after a bizarre “sexting” scandal, is contemplating getting back into politics. New York City voters have been receiving anonymous phone calls from a pollster asking questions about the upcoming mayoral race later this year and Weiner’s name is being mentioned as one of the prospective Democratic candidates.

A Manhattan Democrat who took the telephone survey Monday said: “Clearly, it was someone polling to test whether Anthony Weiner has any viability in the mayor's race.”

The survey also questioned respondents about whether they had a favorable or unfavorable view of Weiner with regard to the scandal that he was involved in. The poll also allegedly noted that Weiner was“forced to leave Congress for sending lewd pictures and lying about it” and went on to mention that “many people say he doesn't have the temperament to be mayor.”

A conflicting report also has Weiner getting back in the world of New York politics, but instead says he is eyeing a bid for city comptroller instead of mayor. If he chooses to throw his hat into the ring in that race, Weiner would be running against heavy favorite and current Manhattan borough president, Scott Stringer.

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No matter what office Weiner ultimately decides to go for, if any, it does appear that he is
at least strongly considering running for something. Weiner recently reserved the Internet address AnthonyWeiner2013.com but played it cool when asked about the new site. “You can speculate I suppose,” said Weiner. “But sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.”

Weiner is believed to have around $4 million that he could use for campaigning as a result of past fundraising efforts.

Source: (NY Post)