Politics

Alabama Republican Says 10 Commandments Statue Has ‘Nothing To Do With Religion’

| by Sarah Fruchtnicht

An Alabama Republican county commissioner plans to erect a monument outside a Scottsboro courthouse displaying the Ten Commandments, but he argues it “has nothing to do with religion.”

Jackson County Commissioner Tim Guffey says the Ten Commandments are “historical documents” that should be displayed alongside statues of the U.S. Constitution and the Declaration of Independence.

He said the Ten Commandments are essential to understanding the constitution.

"I just can't see how you could explain a Constitution – why it was written the way it was written – without understanding why those men wrote it the way they wrote it," Guffey told AL.com.

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“The Ten Commandments is a historical document (in this context) and it has nothing to do with religion,” he said. “It shows that these founders had great beliefs in God and the Ten Commandments and His Word and it helped them get to the point where they were. And I feel like taking that document out, if that document wasn’t there to guide them, then our Constitution wouldn’t be what it is today…But I don’t see how I could do the other two and not do that one and be truthful about it.”

“What I’m trying to do is erect a monument of historical documents,” he said. “It’s the Constitution, the Ten Commandments and the Declaration of Independence. I feel like that’s what this country was founded on. These documents helped America become the greatest country in history.”

“I'm using it in the context of this is historical. I'm not doing it to push religion at all,” he added. “But I don't see how I could do the other two and not do that one and be truthful about it."

He expressed concern that the Ten Commandments aren’t being taught in public school.

"They don't teach this at school anymore and a person would have to go back and research and study each one of those men's writings to find out that that's what established them," he said. "That's what gave them the inspiration to read the greatest Constitution this world has ever seen."

Guffey says he is seeking feedback from his constituents about the proposed monument. He says what he’s heard so far has been “positive.”

Sources: AL.com, ThinkProgress

Image source: Wikimedia Commons / Vmenkov