Video: Mitt Romney vs. President Obama, Highlights From Debate 2

| by Michael Allen

During tonight's town hall debate between President Obama and Mitt Romney, the sparks flew with far more conflict than their first sparring, reports ThinkProgress.org, RawStory.com, Mediaite.com and CNN.

President Obama painted Romney as more extreme than President George W. Bush, whom Romney tried to distance himself from.

Pres. Obama said: “George Bush didn’t propose turning Medicare into a voucher. George Bush embraced comprehensive immigration reform. He didn’t call for self-deportation. George Bush never suggested that we should eliminate funding for Planned Parenthood. So, there are differences between Governor Romney and George Bush, but they’re not on economic policy. In some ways, he’s gone to a more extreme place when it comes to social policy.”

Romney went after President Obama who said that he called the attack on the U.S. embassy an act of terror.

Romney said: “I think it’s interesting that the president just said something, which is on the day after the attack he went in the Rose Garden and said that this was an act of terror. Is that what you’re saying? I want to make sure we get that for the record because it took the president 14 days before he called the attack in Benghazi an act of terror.”

Pres. Obama answered: “Get the transcript." Moderator Candy Crowley then told Romney: “He did, in fact, sir,” Pres. Obama then added: “Can you say that a little louder, Candy?”

Crowley explained: “He did call it an act of terror. It did as well take two weeks or so for the whole idea of there being a riot out there about this tape to come out.”

While explaining his tax plan, Romney told a debate audience that he would pick a number to determine how many deductions Americans could take.

Romney said: “And so in terms of bringing down deductions, one way of doing that would be to say everybody gets, I’ll pick a number, $25,000 in deductions and credits. And you can decide which ones to use, your home mortgage interest deduction, charity, child tax credit and so forth. You can use those as part of filling that bucket, if you will, of deductions.”

During a response by President Obama to a question about gas prices, Romney interrupted the president and the two engaged in a tense argument.