Music

Please No: Snoop Dogg's Next Album 'Doggy Style 2'

| by RefinedHype

 

by SBK

Anger, frustration, irritation… those are just a few terms to describe being mad or pissed off (in extreme measures). It happens to us all usually on a daily basis whether it's that idiot cutting you off in traffic on your way to work, finding out you have to retake that Sociology class again for the third time, or that your favorite artist's album has been pushed back for the (insert ridiculous number here) time.

Some people choose silence as a way of dealing with their anger while others rant their issues via Twitter. Personally I prefer the latter but 140 characters aren't enough to speak my mind. Here's where issues meet article, "Truthfully Speaking" to be exact. Every week at about this time find out what's fcuking up SBK's patience or needs some attention. Welcome to the world of The Madd Rapper Writer.

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About a few weeks ago while in the studio with Swizz Beatz and Kanye West, legendary rapper Snoop Dogg announced via YouTube that his next album would be the follow-up to his 1993 classic "Doggystyle" entitled "Doggystyle 2". (Warning: Adult Langugage)

Obviously Snoop's performance of the classic album in its entirety at this year's Rock The Bells festival brought back nostalgic memories of a better time in his career. But in all honesty as a fan of Snoop's music, particularly the "Doggystyle album", this is the wrong move to make. I can understand how performing classic joints like "Gin and Juice", "Who Am I? (What's My Name)", and "Ain't No Fun (If The Homies Can't Have None)" with the old crew (Daz, Kurupt, Warren G, Lady of Rage) might have evoked that feeling of being 22 again, but homie the big 4-0 is only two years away for you. Would you really want to risk tarnishing the legacy of an album treasured by so many Hip-Hop/Rap fans just to satisfy a momentary feeling?

Just look at the elements that made it work the first time: Dr. Dre early in his prime coming off the success of "The Chronic", a group of hungry young emcees (Daz Dillinger, Kurupt, The Lady of Rage, The D.O.C.), and G-Funk styled production that was a fresh alternative to East Coast boom-bap. Fast forward 17 years: Dr. Dre's pretty busy "working" on "Detox", those once young emcees have aged past their primes, and G-Funk has gave way for spacious pads, 808 kicks, and over-processed vocals.

But Snoop isn't the sole source of this problem for me, it extends to his industry peers like Jay-Z, Raekwon, C-N-N, Method Man & Redman. True there have been other rappers to indulge in series albums (Bun B, Lil Wayne) but we're only talking about classic albums here. Looking at the most recent cases: "The Blueprint 3", "Only Built 4 Cuban Linx… Pt. 2", "The War Report 2", "Blackout! 2", it's puzzling as to why artists find it necessary to travel back to the high points of their career in an attempt to regain the magic and success of past albums.

Out of the four albums previously mentioned, Raekwon came the closest to recapturing the glory of his debut with the others being underwhelming in comparison. There's a reason why classic albums like "Paid In Full", "Long Live The Kane", "Daily Operation", "Mecca and The Soul Brother", "Illmatic", "Ready To Die", "Reasonable Doubt", and others were never revisited, it's called legacy. Could you imagine Nas trying to make "Illmatic II" or Wu-Tang Clan attempting "Wu-Tang: Enter The 36 Chambers Again"? Those albums were a period in time that are practically impossible to reproduce. Whether it's because it was those artists' debut albums or just because 2010 Hip-Hop/Rap is vastly different from 90's Hip-Hop/Rap, the results wouldn't mirror the original.

When I hear respected veteran emcees like AZ and GZA announce their plans for sequels to their classic albums with "Doe Or Die 2" and "Liquid Swords 2: The Return Of The Shadowboxer", it goes from being respectable to being ridiculous. It almost starts to feel like a desperation move for veteran rappers struggling to survive and remain relevant to a new generation of listeners. Believe me most these young ears don't even know the original album you're making a sequel to and if it doesn't have a feature from Drake or Wayne along with some club joints they could care less.

There's a much better way to go about this that avoids risking your album's legacy, it's called Anniversaries! Most of these classic albums will be approaching their 20th anniversaries soon and a special anniversary edition with some extras would fair much better than a subpar sequel. Just look at the the recent deluxe and elite editions of albums like "Mecca and The Soul Brother", "Resurrection", and "Criminal Minded" for example. I'd rather buy a classic album that features the original album tracks, instrumental/acapella/single versions, vintage/exclusive remixes, and detailed liner notes than a revisited album featuring long track listing, popular producers and guests that the artist(s) absent from the original, and trendy songs that cater to radio and a young demographic.

After Raekwon released "Only Built 4 Cuban Linx… Pt. 2" I said to myself "I hope this doesn't become a trend", well now it's look like to be just that. Veteran rappers with classic albums do yourself a favor and leave the past just where it is, there's no need to tarnish your post-retirement legacy. If there's one thing "We Are The World 25 For Haiti" taught us it's that some shit just shouldn't be touched, period.

For more from SBK, check out his work on NappyAfro.

From RefinedHype.com