Money

Former Vice President Al Gore Worth $200 Million

| by Michael Allen

Former Vice President Al Gore has been attacked numerous times by conservatives for opposing capitalism because he advocates trying to stop global warming and supports cap-and-trade laws to limit energy companies from polluting the air.

According to Bloomberg News, back in 2000, Gore had a net worth of about $1.7 million, according to federal disclosure forms filed as part of his presidential run.

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However, Gore may be worth more than $200 million today.

In January, the Current TV network, which Gore co-founded in 2004, was sold to the Al Jazeera Satellite Network for about $500 million. Gore made an estimated $70 million from the sale.

Two weeks later, Gore exercised options, at $7.48 a share, on 59,000 shares of Apple stock for about $30 million. Gore got the stock options a decade ago as he has sat on the company’s board since 2003.

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Gore's remaining Apple stock options, which have not been cashed out, are reportedly worth more than $45.6 million.

Gore has also made millions via his investments in hedge fund companies.

“It doesn’t surprise me,” Reed Hundt, a Gore high-school friend, said of his business success. “It was clear that Al was smart and was going places.”

Gore's best-selling books, “Earth in the Balance,” “An Inconvenient Truth” and “The Assault on Reason,” have contributed all their profits to Gore's nonprofit "Climate Reality Project."

Gore's 2006 Oscar-winning documentary, “An Inconvenient Truth,” helped him win part of a 2007 Nobel Peace Prize and pushed his speaking fee up to $175,000.

Gore was named a senior adviser to Google Inc. before its 2004 initial public offering, but it is not known how many shares or stock options he may own.

Gore was also a partner at Kleiner Perkins and John Doerr, an early investor in Amazon.com Inc., Intuit Inc. and Google.

Source: Bloomberg News