Society

Teacher Refuses to Grade Students' Gun Essays

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Two high school students in Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas, are accusing their English teacher of refusing to grade their papers because they wrote about guns.

According to the teens, their teacher, Dewey Christian, said they could write about ‘anything they wanted,’ but then refused to accept the assignment once they told their teacher what they wrote about.

“I said, ‘Me and my mum went to buy a gun’ and as soon as he heard the word gun he told me to sit down,'" said Alex Wright, a senior at Denton High School, to My Fox Dallas-Fort Worth. His classmate, Marshall Williams, also wrote about guns for the assignment.

Williams’ mother, Kimberly Williams, then went to the school to confront the teacher about the incident and tape recorded their interaction. The teacher explained to the mother that he did not believe it was an appropriate subject matter given recent school shootings and the sensitivity of the topic.

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Williams added in his litany of complaints on Fox News that he felt his right to free speech was infringed on and that his teacher did not allow him to express himself.

However, contrary to public belief, the right to free speech is not guaranteed in schools. According to various Supreme Court rulings, student speech can be limited if it is harmful or disruptive of the educational objectives, which does give school administrators some rights to limit speech in certain cases.

The teacher, however, has since accepted the papers according to the Denton Independent School District and said he was sorry they misunderstood his intention.

“The teacher’s intent was for guns not to be trivialized in any school situation because of recent events,” a district statement said.

Williams told Fox that he does not believe he’s received a ‘satisfactory’ apology.

Meanwhile, on Facebook, a photograph shows Williams’ holding a gun. Despite how seriously he took the matter of his misconceived right to ‘free speech’ in his gun essay, he in turn decides to trivialize the deaths of more than 35 Americans in his caption: “Today I held both the guns used in Aurora and at Sandy Hook Elementary. Contrary to popular belief, everyone in my vicinity did not die."

Source: Dail Mail