Sen. Rand Paul Wants To Halt Immigration Reform After Boston Bombings

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Rand Paul, a senator who is becoming more known for his bold statements than any actual political feats, has now urged the “Gang of 8” to put off immigration reform until further information is gathered about how the Tsarnaev brothers were able to emigrate to the United States.

Paul believes that the Boston Marathon bombings exposed a deep national security problem because the brothers were from the war torn-nation of Chechnya, instead of say, Newtown, Connecticut.

Though Paul is correct — Islamic extremists do pose a threat to America — it is beyond irresponsible for our political leaders to cower in fear and put up “no entry” signs at the front door simply because someone is from a troubled nation.

Sen. Paul, among many others opposed to immigration reform, should not blame countries, but ideologies.

The Tsarnaevs’ uncle, Ruslan Tsarni, is a perfect example of why you can't just ban everyone.

Tsarni, like the Tsarnaevs, came to America from Chechnya without any semblance of terrorist tendencies and was granted a green card. He is a fine, normal, non-murderous person.

“This is the ideal micro-world in the entire world,” he said, referring to the United States, during the press conference he held while the country was looking for his nephew Dzokhar. “I respect this country. I love this country; this country which gives chances to everybody else to be treated as a human being.”

Yet, Paul maintains this in his letter to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell:

We should not proceed [with immigration reform] until we understand the specific failures of our immigration system. Why did the current system allow two individuals to immigrate to the United States from the Chechen Republic in Russia, an area known as a hotbed of Islamic extremism, who then committed acts of terrorism? Were there any safeguards? Could this have been prevented? Does the immigration reform before us address this?

The short answer is: It’s unlikely the Boston bombings could have been prevented without intense, racially-based immigration laws. Those laws, however, would have prevented people like Tsarni's entrance simply because of where he was born. It is impossible to advocate for freedom and liberty around the world if we refuse to offer a safe place for sufferers of harsh, dictatorial regimes simply because they were born in the wrong place. 

Sources: The Daily Caller, Salon