Obama Presidency

U.S. Census Reports White Deaths Outnumber Births For First Time in A Century

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The great melting pot might be finally living up to its reputation as non-Hispanic white Americans saw more deaths than births for the first time in more than a century. Experts claim that white whites are slowly becoming closer in numbers to other minorities and might be a minority itself in a couple decades.

These demographic changes will be incredibly significant in the coming decades as more Asian, Hispanic and black individuals will hold more prominent political and economic positions in society.

“These new census estimates are an early signal alerting us to the impending decline in the white population that will characterize most of the 21st century,” said William Frey, a demographer with the Brookings Institution.

Frey explained in the coming decades, older whites will not be mostly in charge of the economic well-being of these groups. The entering workforce, to say the least, has a much more mixed face than that of 50 years ago and will undoubtedly change the economic and political climate to be more representative of more racial communities.

The issues of minorities — Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, and immigration reform — “will hold greater sway than ever before,” Fray said.

The reported disparity between white births and deaths was very small — only by about 12,000 — but the decline in the white population has come earlier than some experts predicted.

Experts cite the recession as a major factor in the decrease of white births as populations became more anxious about supporting larger families. According to the Census Bureau, 2.3 million white births occurred from July 2006 to 2007 while only 1.9 million were born between July 2011 and 2012, which accounts for a 13.3 percent decline.

According to the Census Bureau report, Asians were the fastest growing group, which increased by 2.9 percent last year. Hispanics grew by 2.2 percent and blacks by 1.3 percent. 

Sources: New York Times, RT