Guns

Minn. Gov. Tim Pawlenty Guilty of Poor Hunting Conduct

| by Michael Markarian

Hunting ethics require sportsmen to do their best to assure a quick
kill, and make every possible effort to find wounded animals to spare
them prolonged suffering.

HuntingNet.com
says a true hunter will “search for an arrow hit or bullet hit animal
that is wounded for as long as possible.” Those who follow the NRA Hunter’s Code of Ethics pledge to “do my best to acquire those marksmanship and hunting skills, which insure clean, sportsmanlike kills.”

Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty apparently had neither the skill nor the time to be a true hunter. He badly wounded a buck
on Saturday at the Minnesota Governor’s Deer Opener, but rather than
follow the blood trail, he followed the money trail to Iowa where he
was headlining a Republican Party fundraiser. The owner of the land
where Pawlenty’s group was hunting described the animal as “bleeding
profusely” and searched for the deer all weekend, but turned up nothing.

It’s surely a sign of reckless and unsportsmanlike behavior to leave
an animal severely injured and hope that others might take on the
responsibility to end the animal’s suffering. If Pawlenty wants to hunt
animals, he should at least have the decency to abide by basic,
centuries-old values. Hunters talk a good game about ethics and humane
treatment, and they should be held to their own professed standards.

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Pawlenty was the same governor, of course, who enacted legislation in 2004 to allow Minnesota’s first mourning dove hunting season
in 58 years. Mourning doves don’t cause nuisance problems, aren’t
overpopulated, and don’t make a viable food source—that’s why they were
protected as songbirds for more than a half-century in Minnesota and
are still protected in many northern and Midwestern states. When
they’re shot for target practice, the small birds are riddled with lead
shot and are of little value to hunters, so about 30 percent of those
hit are left wounded and unretrieved—a fact apparently untroubling to the state’s chief executive hunter.

When Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin was on the Republican ticket in the
2008 presidential campaign, she galvanized animal advocates against the
aerial gunning of wolves and her retrograde wildlife management policies. If Pawlenty decides to launch a presidential bid for 2012, we’ll give his behavior the scrutiny it deserves.