Politics

Mike Huckabee: Legalizing Gay Marriage Akin to Incest, Drug Use

| by Mark Berman

Mike Huckabee is a longtime opponent of same-sex marriage. But now he is choosing words to explain his opposition that are sure to be offensive to gay and non-gay activists alike.

Interviewed by the College of New Jersey news magazine The Perspective after speaking there last week, Huckabee said not every group must be accommodated, especially if their lifestyle is not "the ideal."

"That would be like saying, well there's there are a lot of people who like to use drugs so let's go ahead and accommodate those who want to use drugs. There are some people who believe in incest, so we should accommodate them. There are people who believe in polygamy, should we accommodate them?" he said, according to a transcript of the interview.

He added it would be difficult to choose which lifestyles to make legal. "Why do you get to choose that two men are OK but one man and three women aren't OK?"

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Huckabee also said gay couples should not be allowed to adopt. "Children are not puppies," the 2008 presidential candidate and possible 2012 candidate elegantly said.

Huckabee was quick to point out that he isn't trying to tell people how to live. But he said it's up to gay marriage advocates to prove that same-sex marriages can be as successful as traditional marriages.

"I don't have to prove that marriage is a man and a woman in a relationship for life," he said. "They have to prove that two men can have an equally definable relationship called marriage, and somehow that that can mean the same thing."

In a statement Tuesday, Huckabee said that while he believes what people do in their private lives is their business, "I do not believe we should change the traditional definition of marriage." He also said he thought the college magazine was sensationalizing his "well-known and hardly unusual views of same-sex marriage."