Migrants' Suit Against Germany Is Not Valid

| by Mark Jones
The German flag flies in BerlinThe German flag flies in Berlin

More than 6,000 migrants are suing the German government for taking too long to process asylum claims.  Though most migrants have to wait months or years to hear whether or not Germany accepts them as refugees, their decision to sue is not valid.

Breitbart news reports that the average wait time for migrants seeking asylum is six to nine months. This has led individuals seeking asylum to issue formal complaints against the German Federal Office for Migration and Refugees, better known as BAMF. 

The formal complaints, however, can take up to a year to process, meaning that migrants likely will not hear from BAMF about their complaints before receiving feedback on their asylum claims.

In the midst of this frustration, 6,000 migrants have decided to sue BAMF for “inactivity.”

A closer look at Germany’s recent history proves that accusations of “inactivity” are completely unjustified.

As stated in a DW news article, net immigration in Germany increased by 49 percent in 2015. This is the highest increase in immigrants in German history.

In the past, most of Germany’s emigrants have come from other areas in Europe. The majority of the 1.1 million individuals who entered Germany last year, however, were not from European countries. With war and tragedy plaguing many Middle-Eastern, Asian, and Northern African countries, this statistic is understandable.

With this incredibly large influx of immigrants seeking asylum, slow processing times are to be expected in Germany.

As more refugees enter Germany, the wait times will not become shorter any time in the near future. According to The Local, 3,385 individuals have crossed the Swiss-German border since the start of 2016 in an attempt to gain asylum in Germany.

In an ideal world, individuals seeking asylum would be granted the right to stay in Germany.  The Federal Ministry of the Interior, better known as BMI, says that “Basic Law grants victims of political persecution an individual right of asylum” in Germany.   

In reality, however, a country has to place a limit on the number of people who can reside within its borders.  In order to ensure that it is taking in true refugees who do not present threats to German security, BAMF needs to take its time and make careful decisions.

BMI does not promise instantaneous responses for migrants.

As more and more migrants begin suing the government, however, more and more migrants may come to expect instantaneous responses from BAMF.

According to Breitbart, Reinhard Ruthsatz, a German court spokesperson, believes that complaints and lawsuits could lead to a “tidal wave of litigation against the government by migrants.”

BBC has been monitoring the mass migration in the German city of Oberhausen.  In 2015, the overall attitude of most of the city’s residents was welcoming toward refugees.  In 2016, however, BBC reports that “there are some who say [new arrivals] are creating a strain on a local economy with an 11% rate of unemployment.”

The potential for asylum still exists for hopeful migrants in Germany. Migrants need not file complaints or issue formal lawsuits against the German government when attempting to achieve this dream.

Click here for the opposing view on this topic.

Sources: Breitbart News, BBC, The Local, The Federal Ministry of the Interior, Deutsche Welle / Photo credit: fdecomite/Flickr

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