Drug Law

Maui Cops Campaign Against Medical Marijuana

| by NORML
“We don’t make the laws, we just enforce ‘em” – Every cop ever.

If I had a dime every time some cop said that, I could afford a dimebag. Yet time after time when legislatures come into session, there are the cops, in uniform, testifying against medical marijuana and decriminalization or re-legalization of cannabis.

(Maui News) After seeing more and more bills in the Legislature intended to liberalize marijuana use, Maui Police Chief Gary Yabuta said the department is taking a more “proactive stance” to show the public its opposition to marijuana by reaching out to Maui residents at public places.

On Monday, officers went to Walmart to pass out pamphlets on what experts say about marijuana as medicine and related health risks, a news release said. They will be there again today.

Yabuta did not know the cost of the brochures that are being passed out but said they were nothing fancy. Funding came partly from a grant that initiated the brochure, as well as county funds.

Chief Gary Yabuda thinks medical marijuana sends "the wrong message to the youth that it's socially OK to use marijuana." Click Gary to tell him otherwise.

Nice to know that the taxpayers of Maui County are buying brochures to convince themselves that medical marijuana is bad.

“It’s something that we feel is an important message for the public to know from what we believe is the reality of marijuana, that if we continue to have an attempt to lax the marijuana law, we are going to be advocating the wrong message to the youth that it’s socially OK to use marijuana. We feel that it will be contradictory to character building, job skills, academics, all the skills necessary to become a productive citizen,” Yabuta said Monday.

Like, say, a 17-year-old kid named Barry who grew up in Hawaii using marijuana and cocaine with his friends… that guy never amounted to anything!

The police department also is voicing its opposition to two Senate bills, one (SB 58) that would increase the amount of medical marijuana that one could possess; and the other (SB 175) that would transfer the jurisdiction of the medical marijuana laws from the Department of Public Safety to the Department of Health.

Now, why would we want to have something called medical marijuana run by something called a Department of Health? In Yabuda’s mind, the medical marijuana should continue to be run by the Department of Public Safety.

The police pamphlet quotes agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration saying that “smoked marijuana has no currently accepted or proven medical use in the United States and is not an approved medical treatment.”

It also says the American Medical Association discourages medical marijuana use and that cannabis is a dangerous drug and is a public health concern.

Could that be the same AMA that said, “short term controlled trials indicate that smoked cannabis reduces neuropathic pain, improves appetite and caloric intake especially in patients with reduced muscle mass, and may relieve spasticity and pain in patients with multiple sclerosis,” and “the Schedule I status of marijuana be reviewed with the goal of facilitating clinical research and development of cannabinoid-based medicines, and alternate delivery methods”?