Music

Bon Jovi Right about Steve Jobs? Did He Kill Music Business?

| by Mark Berman Opposing Views

Rocker Jon Bon Jovi has some harsh words for Steve Jobs, saying the Apple CEO is destroying the experience of listening to music.

"Kids today have missed the whole experience of putting the headphones on, turning it up to 10, holding the jacket, closing their eyes and getting lost in an album; and the beauty of taking your allowance money and making a decision based on the jacket, not knowing what the record sounded like, and looking at a couple of still pictures and imagining it," he told the Sunday New York Times Magazine. "God, it was a magical, magical time."

And Bon Jovi said it is all Jobs's fault.

"I hate to sound like an old man now, but I am, and you mark my words, in a generation from now people are going to say: 'What happened?' Steve Jobs is personally responsible for killing the music business."

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But Bon Jovi got it wrong. He wasn't talking about the actual "business" of music, only the experience of listening to music on an iPod and buying songs on iTunes rather than being able to handle the actual album. Jobs is a genius -- but his iTunes store wasn't groundbreaking in terms of its digital music distribution. The Apple head merely took an existing medium and perfected it.

Many claim Sean Parker is the one who killed the business aspect of music when he invented Napster. The free music exchange site cost the record companies billions of dollars before it was finally shut down. It led to other sites that still operate illegally.

The Huffington Post said the iTunes Store has become the number one music vendor in the country -- on February 24, it sold its 10 billionth song download.