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Is Giant Guatemala City Sinkhole Proof of Hollow Earth Theory?

| by Mark Berman Opposing Views

Conventional wisdom is that the huge sinkhole that opened up on a street in Guatemala City earlier this week was caused by floodwaters from Tropical Storm Agatha. But unconventional thinkers say it could be proof of the so-called "Hollow Earth Theory."

This is a largely discredited theory that the earth is either entirely hollow, or has substantial hollow places all over. The idea has been around since ancient times, and now and then another report or book comes out to further it.

But science appears to have disproved the Hollow Earth Theory. It points out that if Earth were hollow, its mass would be much lower and thus its gravity on the outer surface would be much lower than it is. And by observing vibrations passing from one end of the planet to the other, scientists have been able to calculate the structure of Earth. And they say it is not a hollow structure.

But theorists still abound. In fact, a web site called The Hollow Earth Theory claims:

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There is a wealth of evidence surfacing today that throws our current beliefs regarding the structure of our planet into serious doubt.

As far as the Guatemala City sinkhole (or entrance to the hollow world, depending on whom you believe), the perfectly round hole is 65 feet in diameter, and 100 feet deep. Residents in the neighborhood, called Ciudad Nueva, have long complained about the strange streets. Newspaper reports say people claim they feel hollow in certain places.

According to resident Karla Diaz, “For years we’ve heard loud rumblings coming from the ground. People reported this, along with random holes that would pop up in the pavement, but no one ever came to investigate.”

Perhaps Ciudad Nueva is just a neighborhood with poor footings for construction. But perhaps it is something more -- the entryway into the hollow earth.