How to Scare Your Kids Into Avoiding All Drugs

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A very concerned mother recently wrote to us because she had discovered that her 17 year-old son was smoking pot. She was worried about addiction and asked us what we would do in her situation to help him realize the spiritual and other consequences of his choices.

Even though we intuitively felt that her son didn't have a problem, seemingly innocuous experimentation can easily lead to a destructive habit or addiction.

Even with all the efforts by schools and parents to educate young people about the dangers of drugs, most teens will try them anyway. Ordering a teen to never do drugs, of course, will probably only make them want to try them more.

It would greatly benefit teens if their mentors were aware of and explained the spiritual side effects of drug and excessive alcohol use. We believe that when you completely understand the spiritual complications involving drug and alcohol abuse, it’s much easier to say no thanks, every time.

Having seen firsthand the toxic, life-wrecking spiritual side effects of drugs on individuals for years through our work, three years ago, when a party host placed a tray of cocaine in front of Stephen, even though he’d had a few drinks and his guard was down somewhat, it was still easy for him to decline the offer. In fact, because he is so aware of the harsh spiritual consequences of cocaine, the drugs looked about appealing to him as a pile of dog crap.

We strongly suspect that cocaine, crystal meth, and other drugs are favored tools of the dark side, their use encouraged to break down, control, manipulate and destroy people. Even one night of mind- altering substances can make for a hell of a future challenge.

Imagine volunteering to carry around an invisible, 40 pound gargoyle on your back for years. It constantly berates you, skews your judgment, weakens your stamina, makes you paranoid--your life becomes an uphill battle and challenges are drawn out and magnified. And that’s just the beginning of your road-trip into purgatory.

The message is pretty simple: beyond experimentation in high school and college, drug use will only cause major problems. If you want to be the best you can be, there is no room for any drug use or excess alcohol consumption. At first, drugs may seem to enhance creativity, awareness, and fun, but recovering addicts realize it was all a lie.

For every artificial high, there is an equal, devastating low, side-tracking you from your life’s mission.

Afraid your teen won’t believe you? Visit a drug rehabilitation clinic and let them see for themselves what drugs can do to people. Search on Youtube for videos showcasing the dangers of drugs or addiction and watch them with your teen. Then talk about what you witnessed and ask if they know anyone headed in the same perilous direction.

If teenagers could see what we’ve seen, they would recognize that using any drug even one time can block intuition for a long time and attract lost souls and spiritual parasites, which can encourage anger, depression, despair, and denial. Other effects include mistaking the negative thoughts of lost souls and spiritual parasites for yours, suicidal thoughts, a strong desire for more drug use, and worse.

Through our work with Spiritual Detox we have found that most regular drug users, addicts, and heavy drinkers harbor from a few to a whole army of lost souls, many of whom were addicts before they died, and gravitated to a host who would feed their addiction.

An aside, it’s possible to identify potential alcohol and drug problems (addictive personality, etc.) through comprehensive handwriting analysis, and astrology and numerology, which would help parents spot warning signs before a serious problem developed.

Help the teens in your life focus on their long-term goals, and do everything you can to help them realize how drug use could potentially destroy them. If they want an escape from the pressures of being at that tumultuous age, encourage alternatives, such as a simple and regular meditation, which can be just what they need to help them stay on track and reach their full potential.

Copyright © Scott Petullo, Stephen Petullo