An Illinois doctor who performs abortions in Fort Wayne, Ind., and has been criticized for failing to properly report abortions on teen girls will take a temporary break from his operations.

Fort Wayne News-Sentinel reported that Dr. Ulrich Klopfer will be taking a “hiatus” from performing abortions in Fort Wayne because he lost his backup physician, Dr. Geoffrey Cly, whose resignation is effective Jan. 1.

Cathie Humbarger, executive director of Allen County Right to Life says Klopfer’s clinic in South Bend will continue to accept patients from Fort Wayne starting next week, even though pre-abortion counseling could still be offered locally.

“They'll have to drive another 100 or 200 miles,” Klopfer said. “That will add to their cost and hardship.”

But Humbarger said the end of the clinic would be “tremendous news for desperate mothers and babies vulnerable to abortion. Our goal has been to make Allen County abortion-free.”

Doctors who practice but don’t live in Allen County are required by county ordinance to have relationship with a local doctor who can legally practice there. State law also require abortionists to have local admitting privileges or have an agreement with a physician who has admitting privileges at a county hospital or neighboring county in case of post-operative complications, according to the News-Sentinel.

However, Cly said he was terminating his relationship with Klopfer because of how the doctor handled abortions on girls under 14.

“Furthermore, you told an online news publication, RH Reality Check, that you now advise girls under 14 and their parents or guardians that they can go to Illinois or Ohio to avoid (Indiana's) under-14 reporting requirement for child sexual abuse,” Cly wrote. “Your failure to report 13-year-olds' abortions properly and your subsequent admission to advising parents to avoid state laws is alarming. According to Indiana law, sex with a girl under 14 – regardless of the perpetrator's age – is child abuse. Your advice to cross state lines for abortions may help child abuse to continue and a perpetrator or abuser to walk free.”

“Abortions are legal, but I still want to keep women safe,” said Cly, who declined to comment on Klopfer's future in Allen County. reported that in October, 17 women filed about 500 complaints against Klopfer for errors and omissions on abortion reports in Fort Wayne. On Dec. 3, more than 600 complaints were filed by 20 women in Gary, Ind.

In their complaints, the women demanded the suspension of Klopfer’s medical license and called for a full investigation. Local Right to Life leaders also seek criminal charges against Klopfer.

Failure to file proper reports about abortions carries a Class B misdemeanor charge in the state of Indiana.