Health

Woman Quits Smoking During Eighth Pregnancy After Losing Two Children

| by Will Hagle

The dangers of smoking while pregnant have long been publicized, but one mother of five is just coming to terms with the fact that her smoking habit might have been the cause of her son’s death. 

The woman, Sophie Jones, gave birth to a stillborn son named Korey in 2011. According to the Daily Mail, she has just now acknowledged that her habit of smoking 25 cigarettes a day might have contributed to the stillbirth. Korey is the second child whom Jones has lost, as her son, Frankie, died at 4 days old of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Smoking is also a known risk factor of SIDS. 

“It is absolutely devastating to lose two children as you never expect that to happen,” Jones said to the Daily Mail. “When I go to tidy up their graves, I think I should be tidying their bedrooms, not their gravesides. I think about them both everyday, but it’s particularly sad at this time of year because on Christmas Day I think there should be two more piles of presents.” 

Jones does still have five healthy children, although she claims she smoked during all of her preceding pregnancies. She is pregnant once again and claims to have ditched the nicotine habit altogether after learning of the many associated negative consequences. 

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“I never fully understood the risks of smoking while pregnant; I just thought it led to a smaller baby,” Jones said. “How wrong I was. I cut down when I fell pregnant, but obviously that wasn’t enough to save my baby.” 

The CDC reports that “approximately 10% of women reported smoking during the last 3 months of pregnancy,” with 55 percent quitting during pregnancy and 40 percent relapsing within six months after birth. Smoking is known to lead to many different birth complications, and quitting smoking at any time during a pregnancy can be beneficial. 

Sources: The Daily Mail, The Centers for Disease Control / Photo Credit: WikiCommons