She Thinks He's Cheating: Real Issue Is Far Deadlier

| by Sheena Vasani
Brain scansBrain scans

A rare brain cyst caused one woman from Turkey sleepless nights worrying her husband was cheating.

The unidentified 43-year-old mother of one reportedly went to great lengths to prove her husband’s guilt despite being married for 20 years, the Daily Mail reports.

From rummaging through personal belongings to checking his cellphone, the increasingly irritable woman’s suspicions even caused her insomnia, doctors say.

Family members say the delusions appeared to begin after her daughter got bad grades and was forced to change school.

Yet an MRI scan revealed the problem lay quite literally in her head, not within her family.

Doctors explain they found a large porencephalic cyst in the right frontal lobe of the woman’s brain.

According to the Centre For Neuro Skills, it is this exact location that is our “emotional control center,” as well as “home to our personality.”

Officials concluded that the woman’s suspicions stemmed from psychosis caused by the cyst. This was despite the fact she had never reported any psychological difficulties before.

Only weeks after doctors prescribed her with antipsychotic medicine, her paranoid delusions and irritability improved dramatically. However, it is unclear what the status of her marriage is as a result of her suspicions.

It is also not clear how she may have contracted such an illness. Authorities explain cysts can be present from birth, but viruses can also cause them, as can bumps to the head.

“The frontal lobes are extremely vulnerable to injury due to their location at the front of the cranium, proximity to the sphenoid wing and their large size,” the Centre for Neuro Skills explains. “MRI studies have shown that the frontal area is the most common region of injury following mild to moderate traumatic brain injury.”

Damage to the brain’s frontal lobes can also cause seizures and learning disabilities, although the woman did not report either.

“There is no other part of the brain where lesions can cause such a wide variety of symptoms,” the Centre for Neuro Skills writes.

Sources: Daily Mail, Centre for Neuro Skills / Photo credit: Daily Mail 

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