Kenneth Krause Defends Email About News Anchor Jennifer Livingston

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The man who criticized a local Wisconsin news anchor for being overweight has issued a defense to his email in which he offers to "help" the anchor lose weight.

According to the Daily Mail, personal injury lawyer Kenneth Krause explained that he was only trying to point out the dangers of obesity and urge Jennifer Livingston to take advantage of her "fortuitous position in the community" by losing weight. 

The defense email reads:

"Given this country's present epidemic of obesity and the many truly horrible diseases related thereto, and considering Jennifer Livingston's fortuitous position in the community, I hope she'll finally take advantage of a rare and golden opportunity to influence the health and psychological well-being of Coulee region children by transforming herself for all of her viewers to see over the next year - And to that end I would be absolutely pleased to offer her any advice or support she would be willing to accept."

It is no surprise that Krause is offering to help Livingston, as pictures from his Facebook reveal he is a fitness fanatic. One photo shows him on a trail surrounded by trees, with his knee leaning against a mountain bike. 

Once his original email to Livingston went viral, Krause quickly became one of the most "vilified men in America."

Livingston explained that she was not upset that he called her obese, but that he called her a bad role model to girls in the community. 

"The person called me obese and I can deal with that and being called fat, but it was calling me a bad role model that really rubbed me the wrong way," Livingston said on the Today show. 

"Not only for our community but in particular for young girls, I am a mother of three young girls and I felt that was an unfair judgement of someone who didn't know me."

The hurtful email prompted Livingston to shed light on the affects of bullying in the community. The news anchor's 10-year-old daughter was part of the reason she decided to draw attention to the email on-air. 

"I'm trying to inspire her and teach her that if she sees bullying - the importance of taking a stand. But what kind of message am I teaching her if my husband and I are talking about this mean email I've received and I'm not taking a stand for myself," Livingston said. 

Livingston planned to "laugh off" the email as she is used to receiving criticism from people, but after her husband posted it on Facebook, she was encouraged by hundreds of people to speak out. 

"Do not let your self-worth be defined by bullies. Learn from my experience - that the cruel words of one are nothing compared to the shouts of many," she said.