Health

7-Year-Old Girl Injected With Wrong Medicine By Teacher, Family Says

| by Sean Kelly
7-year-old Karmani Ford7-year-old Karmani Ford

A family is looking for answers after a 7-year-old girl was reportedly given the wrong medication at from her teacher at Beltline Elementary School in Lancaster, Texas.

Karmani Ford, 7, was in school when she was given a shot during class, Fox 4 News reports. Karmani, who is diabetic, is given shots before and after school, but had never been treated during class. When her teacher administered a shot during class, Karmani said she was confused and scared.

“She got the medicine out of the black bag and took the top off, and the needle was a little long, and that's why I started crying, because I've never gotten medicine at the school before, and the needle was big,” Karmani told Fox 4 News.

Shortly after being given the medicine, Ford began to feel its effects.

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“I was feeling shaky and sweaty,” she said. “Scared and sleepy…I got up and told my teacher."

The teacher then took her blood sugar.

“It was 47, and she gave me peppermint and two cartons of juices and some crackers,” Karmani said. "She told me to eat them really fast…she called the nurse and said that she gave me the wrong medicine. She seemed upset."

Karmani’s mother subsequently took a picture of the medicine that was given to her daughter. It had another child’s name written on it.

“They said, ‘Well, she just made a mistake,’” Ford’s grandfather, Gregory Allen, said. “I said, ‘That's not just a mistake, that's neglect.’ We said, ‘Can you call a paramedic to check her out?’ And she said, ‘It's not necessary,’ and then she said it costs money.”

Allen said that the incident could’ve put his granddaughter into a diabetic coma.

“It could have taken another turn, and I feel like they were trying to sweep it under the rug and not call paramedics,” he said.

Karmani’s family is now looking for a new school.

When confronted about the mistake, the school district said that the incident occurred because of “human error.” 

The situation in Texas is similar to a 2013 case in Ohio, in which a second-grader with a hyperactivity disorder was given anti-hyperactivity medication that was prescribed to another student. The family of the second-grader filed a lawsuit against the school following the incident, USA Today reported at the time.

Sources: Fox 4 News, USA Today / Photo credit: Fox 4 News