Health

Sleepwalker Goes Missing, Found Safe 9 Miles Away

| by Reve Fisher
Taylor Gammel.Taylor Gammel.

A 19-year-old Colorado woman was missing for more than two hours after she left her home sleepwalking. She was found at a relative's house, 9 miles away, reports CBS Denver.

Taylor Gammel left her Arvada home early in the morning on Oct. 27. Gammel's father noticed she was missing around 6 a.m., but her car was still at home.

“She had walked away from the house before and it was very concerning,” Jefferson County Sheriff spokesman Mark Techmeyer told CBS Denver.

Around 20 to 25 deputies from Jefferson County, police officials from Arvada, and a bloodhound took part in the search for the missing woman. Around 8:15 a.m., someone contacted police after having seen the incident on the news to inform them that Gammel was seen on a bus.

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“The bloodhound tracked her to a 7-Eleven which is directly next door to the bus stop,” Techmeyer said.

Denver's Regional Transportation District is investigating the case to confirm whether or not she indeed boarded a bus, as most buses used in the area have surveillance equipment.

“We think there’s a distinct possibility she got on that bus,” Techmeyer said.

Eventually, Gammel's uncle called police to let them know she was safe at his home in Westminster, approximately 9 miles away from her home, reports Fox 31 News.

Gammel reportedly woke up while walking down the sidewalk and realized she was near her uncle's home. She was only wearing socks and had no phone or ID.

“She’s safe, she’s sound, she was found at a relative’s house, the mystery is how did she get there,” said Techmeyer.

Gammel was questioned by police, but investigators do not suspect any foul play.

“The person is unaware of what’s going on, still technically sleeping,” Dr. Sheila Tsai with the National Jewish Health Sleep Center told CBS Denver.

Tsai said many sleepwalkers typically move around their home, but it's rare that they do anything more extreme and complicated. She stated that it would be odd for a sleepwalker to successfully board a bus.

“To communicate with someone, to take out the cash and pay for something, that would be more complicated," she explained.

Sources: CBS Denver, Fox 31 News / Photo credit: CBS Denver