Health

Texas Cops Post Fake Ebola Warning On Facebook

| by Michael Allen
Granite Shoals Police CarGranite Shoals Police Car

The Granite Shoals, Texas, Police Department recently posted a fake Ebola warning on their Facebook page in an effort to arrest people who use methamphetamine (meth), but have since taken it down.

PhotographysNotACrime.com notes the police department's fake health alert used the headline, "Breaking News: Area Meth and Heroin Supply Possibly Contaminated With Ebola," and stated:

Meth and Heroin recently brought in to Central Texas as well as the ingredients used to make it could be contaminated with the life threatening disease Ebola. If you have recently purchased meth or heroin in Central Texas, please take it to the local police or sheriff department so it can be screened with a special device. DO NOT use it until it has been properly checked for possible Ebola contamination! Contact any Granite Shoals PD officer for testing. Please share in hopes we get this information to anyone who has any contaminated meth or heroin that needs tested.

Another fake posting included the real arrest of a meth user, but the police reportedly took down that posting, which reads: 

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This judge looked an inmate square in the eyes and did something that left the entire courtroom in tears:

This morning, we had our first concerned citizen notify the Granite Shoals Police Department that they believed their methamphetamine may be tainted. Our officers gladly took the item for further testing. Results and booking photos are pending.

Please continue to report any possibly tainted methamphetamine or other narcotics to the Granite Shoals Police Department. Public health and safety continue to remain our #1 priority. ‪#‎not kidding‬

Chastity Eugina Hopson was tricked by the fake health posting, and was booked for drug possession by the police on March 24, reports KEYE TV.

Texas had an authentic, confirmed Ebola outbreak in 2014.

KEYE TV added that the police department said the fake health posting was meant to be funny. However, when public opinion turned on them, Police Sgt. Chris Decker tried to justify the department's false alert by writing about police officers' souls being eaten, media bias, and officers killed in the line of duty. As reported by the New York Daily News, Decker wrote, “The current atmosphere in this country, at least according to the news media, is anti-police." He added, "This career can eat your soul. Law enforcement continually ranks as the profession with the highest rate of suicide, divorce, and substance abuse.”

Decker argued that cops must face “situations that can be more confusing and more dangerous” than U.S. soldiers in war, and posted a link to the Law Enforcement Down Memorial website, which counts police deaths.

“Look for more posts to come that include suspects we are seeking information on, safety updates, interactions with citizens, In The Line of Duty Deaths, and things that make us laugh,” Decker added. “I hope this will allow you to see who we are, humans, just like you. We have families, friends, lives, laugh, cry, and bleed all the same.”

Sources: New York Daily News, PhotographyIsNotACrime.com, KEYE TV / Photo Credit: Granite Shoals Police Department/Facebook

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