Health

At Least Six Women Plan To Sue Charlie Sheen Over HIV Exposure, Report Says (Video)

| by Michael Allen
Charlie Sheen on "Today" showCharlie Sheen on "Today" show

Charlie Sheen told the "Today" show on Nov. 17 that he is HIV-positive (video below).

That revelation has triggered at least six women to prepare lawsuits against the actor for intentional infliction of emotional distress, fraud and sexual battery, reports TMZ.

An unidentified lawyer told the gossip site that he met with six women on Nov. 16 and had four more appointments with women on Nov. 17.

The women are saying that they had protected and unprotected sex with the 50-year-old star as recently as October, but he didn't tell them that he was HIV-positive.

Popular Video

This judge looked an inmate square in the eyes and did something that left the entire courtroom in tears:

Sheen told "Today" show host Matt Lauer that he had always informed his sex partners of his HIV-positive status.

An unidentified source claimed that Sheen has been with at least 200 people in the past two years, so the lawsuits will likely grow.

Another unidentified "legal source" told the New York Daily News that at least five of Sheen's sex partners have hired a California attorney.

"These aren't shakedowns," the attorney told the newspaper. "If Charlie Sheen's name was Charlie Brown, he still could be sued."

The lawyer also said that Sheen needs to "own up to what he did."

"What he did was not only civilly actionable but probably criminal too," the lawyer added.

The lawyer described the sex partners as adult film stars, fans and escorts who are "concerned about going public because they don't want their parents to know and don't want to be labeled as having been exposed."

Sheen told the "Today" show that he decided to go public because he was being blackmailed for millions of dollars. The controversial actor added that he found out he was HIV-positive four years ago, and he has been taking medication.

Sarah Warbelow, legal director at the Human Rights Campaign, told US News that someone can only be charged with a felony in California if a sex partner intentionally tried to infect them with HIV. However, Sheen could face misdemeanor charges, which would mean a fine or up to six months behind bars.

It's not clear if Sheen had sex with people outside California. HIV disclosure laws vary from state to state.

Sources: TMZ, New York Daily News, US News / Photo Credit: NBC News Screenshot