Health

Pharmacist Saves Woman's Life After She Was Stung By A Wasp

| by Jonathan Constante

A Canadian woman had no idea she was allergic to wasps until she got stung and almost lost her life.

Josee Asselin was working in her garden a few weeks ago when she felt a sting on her arm. She said she thought it was a wasp and continued about her day.

But in less than a minute, Asseline began itching all over her body. She drove over to her local pharmacy to pick up some antihistamine, CBC News reported.

Asselin said her symptoms worsened during the eight-minute drive to the pharmacy. The itching spread from her scalp to her legs and she began to have trouble breathing.

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“It was getting more difficult (to breathe) and my face was getting numb,” she told news station.

(Josee Asselin)

When she finally got to the pharmacy, her pharmacist, Ugo Deschenes, immediately noticed something was wrong.

"He brought me right away in his office, he asked me a few questions… He came back with an EpiPen and — bang! — on my leg,” Asselin said.

The emergency dose of epinephrine made Asselin’s symptoms go away. Deschenes insisted on taking her to the hospital, but Asselin did not want to go.

"I didn't think it was life threatening," she said.

Still, Deschenes called paramedics and on the drive to the hospital, Asselin’s symptoms returned. She began itching worse than before and had bumps all over her legs and stomach.

At the hospital, Asselin said doctors took care of her right away. Doctors told her that she should thank her pharmacist because he saved her life.

“He’s always been professional,” Asselin said of Deschenes. “He’s a very nice person. He took care of me. He didn’t listen to me when I said I didn’t want to go to the hospital.”

Asselin was given medicine to take for a week and was told to stay far away from wasps. She said she still has a bump on her arm and is waiting for tests to confirm if her case was an allergic reaction.

Three percent of adults suffer from potentially life-threatening insect stings, according to Allergic Living.

Sources: CBC News, Allergic Living

Photo Credit: Alvesgaspar Wiki Media, Wikipedia