Health

Pastor Who Donated His Kidney May Have Saved His Own Life

| by Lisa Fogarty
wphotowphoto

A pastor from North Carolina generously donated his kidney to save the life of a gospel singer he had just met at his church, but he ended up saving his own life in the process.

Pastor Tim Jones reportedly met Don Herbert, a former professional wrestler and singer, at a church fundraising event last fall. When he discovered Herbert was suffering from kidney failure and in desperate need of a transplant, Jones volunteered and, after a series of tests, found out he was a good match for the man, reports CBS News.

"I wanted to give him a chance at life, I wanted to give him hope," Jones told WBTV. "I prayed for peace with it and a couple of days later God gave me peace. I told my wife we're going to do this." 

While Jones was undergoing the transplant procedure at Duke University Medical Center, the unexpected happened: his operation took six hours -- twice as long as it was supposed to -- because doctors reportedly discovered he had an aneurysm in one of his arteries. 

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If left untreated, an aneurysm can rupture and cause internal bleeding. Jones reportedly works as a surgical technologist and says he was very well aware of the risk.

"God used the story to save both our lives," Jones said. "If I hadn't listened to God's voice to give my kidney, I might not have been here much longer if it ruptured." 

Herbert says he is also thankful that Jones volunteered to save his life and that he is no longer one of 90,000 people in the United States waiting for kidney transplants, reports WBTV.

"Nobody wants to help anybody anymore, at least you think, but I'm glad that there are still some people that are willing to help," Herbert said.

Source: CBS News, WBTV/Photo Credit: WBTV, WikiCommons