Health

Parents Turn Off Their Son's Life Support On The Same Day His Twin Was Cleared To Go Home

| by Amanda Andrade-Rhoades

Harley May’s 100 days of life were agonizing for his parents, Demi and Steve May of Salisbury, England. 

Harley and his twin, Harrison, were born via emergency cesarean section on Jan. 16, Mirror reported. During Demi’s pregnancy, the twins suffered from selective intrauterine growth restriction, meaning the placenta wasn’t equally distributed. As a result, Harley was born far weaker than his brother. 

Although Harrison was born with an open valve in his heart and had to undergo surgery for the condition, Harley had a series of medical issues, including hernias and detached retinas, Daily Mail reported. 

Harley was so frail his parents weren't allowed to touch him, but on April 29 they made the decision to turn off his life support, giving them a few hours to hold their son. A few hours later, doctors decided Harrison was well enough to return home. 

“I will always feel guilty for the decision I made, but really I had no choice,” Demi said.  

“It will take some time to come to terms with it but I know it was the right thing to do. Harley would have had no quality of life and we didn't want that for him. Now, when I hold Harrison in my arms I can't help but think of his twin. It really is a bittersweet feeling.”

At the time of her son’s death, Demi was 20. “…I'd never lost anyone, to lose my own son was horrendous.”

Sources: Daily Mail, Mirror Photo credit: May Family via Daily Mail