Tennessee Mother Plans 'Nurse-In' After Chick-fil-A Asks Her Not To Breast-Feed

| by Jonathan Wolfe
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Last year, Chick-fil-A found itself in the news when the restaurant famously opposed same-sex marriage.

A year later, the company is in the news again for taking a stance on an issue, but this one is a bit different.

Tennessee mother Jennifer Day has planned a “nurse-in” scheduled for today at her local Chick-fil-A after workers told her she could not breast-feed her child in the restaurant without covering.

Day was in the play area of the restaurant breast-feeding her 5-month-old infant when an employee approached her and tol her "some of the other parents were afraid of allowing their kids to play in the area while [she] was feeding her, especially without any cover.”

Day did not like being told to cover up. Tennessee law is on her side, too. In Tennessee, mothers can breast-feed in any public or private place and it is not considered public indecency. Local governments are not allowed to prohibit public breast-feeding, and employers must make accommodations for breast-feeding mothers.

“Any mother is allowed to breast-feed her child if she’s in that place otherwise,” Day said. “They were made for a purpose, a God-given ability. It’s the best gift you can give to your child.”

A Chick-fil-A representative said the manager that told Day to cover up has since “apologized and regrets any offense he may have caused."

As part of their coverage of the story, Tennessee news station KSDK asked several locals what their opinion on open breast-feeding was. Most did not seem to have a problem with it. Here’s a few of their responses:

“Its fine with me, I mean I don't have any issue with it," said one supporter.

"I don't think you should do it in public. At all. I think it's something you should do at home, or when everyone's not looking," said another person who opposes public breast-feeding.

"I breast fed, but I felt it was easier for myself if I was covered up. I think it's also more acceptable if you're covered up," another respondent said. 

Sources: The Blaze, KSDK