Health

Oregon Woman Sues Walmart After Shampoo Ruins Several Feet Of Her Hair

| by Sarah Fruchtnicht

An Oregon woman is suing Walmart and a shampoo maker for $10,000 after she says she used a product that left her hair so tangled she had to cut it for the first time in years.

Jennifer Fahey, 30, claims she’s had hair down her back for most of her life. She says she bought a bottle of Equate Everyday Clean Dandruff Shampoo from a Portland Walmart last year. On Oct. 8, the first time she used the shampoo, her hair became irreparably tangled and she had to cut most of it off.

Her attorney William Ball told the Oregonian she had to cut off several feet of hair, leaving her with only four inches on her head.

“She was not able to remove the knots and as a result she had to cut a large portion of her hair from the top and back of her head,” says the suit, filed Monday in Multnomah County Circuit Court.

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Fahey saved the bottle of shampoo for chemical analysis, which Ball says hasn’t yet been completed.

The suit names Walmart and the St. Louis-based shampoo-maker, Vi-Jon, as defendants.

She is seeking $10,000 for her "past, present and future physical and emotional pain and suffering, anxiety, humiliation and embarrassment, expenses for replacement hair, along with diminished and lost wages" and “loss of life’s pleasures and activities.”

Walmart website lists the 23.7-ounce bottle of Equate at $3.44.

Hundreds of women sued Unilever last year after they claimed Suave Professionals Keratin Infusion 30-Day Smoothing Kit caused hair loss. A settlement was reached for three class action suits in February.

Unilever agreed to create two funds: a "Reimbursement Fund" of $250,000, to reimburse consumers for their purchase of the Smoothing Kit, and an "Injury Fund" of $10,000,000, to compensate consumers for bodily injuries and for emotional distress that accompanied bodily injury.

Sources: Oregonian, CNN