A 21-year-old Oregon woman became infected with a deadly flesh-eating bacteria after a minor bike accident on June 15.

Kylie Marble is still in the hospital after she fell off of her bike and cut her knee on a paved path.

Doctors stitched up the cut without any knowledge that a rare flesh-eating infection was making its way through her skin and muscle.

The next day she was suffering intense pain and returned to the hospital where doctors found necrotizing fasciitis, which destroys the body’s soft tissue. The probability of contracting this bacteria is extremely low, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). About 650 to 800 people become infected annually.

Marble was sedated and did not wake up for a week. In the meantime, they warned her family that the leg may have to be amputated.

Doctors were able to rid her body of the bacteria and save the limb. She remains at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital and will undergo a series of skin grafts, plastic surgeries and intense physical therapy.

Most people who contract necrotizing fasciitis have other health problems that lower the body’s ability to fight infection, the CDC says. The chances of a healthy young adult with good hygiene and who practiced "proper wound care" getting the infection is “extremely low.”

"My brother put it this way: tt's like I won the lottery in a terrible way. This is such a random, random thing," Marble said.

"I'm blessed to be here," she added.

Sources: New York Daily News, WJBF

Image Screenshot: ABC News