Mother Finds Strict Diet and Exercise Plan in 7-Year-Old's Room

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An Australian mother was shocked to find that her seven-year-old daughter created a “diet” list, which included a strict regime of eating only fruits and yogurt as well as doing various exercises daily.

Amy Cheney, mother of three, was in her daughter’s room when she saw the weight-loss plan sitting on the floor amongst her Polly Pockets and friendship bracelets.

Called “diyet,” the list includes an eating and exercise plan for her to complete everyday, including boxes next to the items for her to check off as she completes them.

Cheney was astonished that her daughter even knew what a diet was.

She uploaded the list onto a lifestyle site called Mamma Mia, and said, “I found this today in my daughter’s room. My daughter is seven. ‘Diyet.’ Jesus. Where did she learn the word diet? How does she even know what a freaking diet is?”

She asked how it was possible for her to know what a diet was.

“Whose fault is this? Is it mine because I let her play with Barbies? Because sometimes she’s allowed to watch Total Drama Action? Is it because when I draw with her I can only draw stick figures?”

The note says the girl can eat two “yoget,” three “appals,” one “per,” and two “keewee froots” a day, making her daily intake around 580 calories, though a girl her age should be eating around 1,740 calories a day.

Along with the diet, the list includes a workout routine including 34 “pooshups,” 32 star jumps, three bike rides and running up and down the driveway three times a day.

When Cheney read the list, she felt sick.

“I felt sick. Physically ill. Like someone had knocked the air from my chest. I could feel myself getting increasingly anxious the more words I was able to interpret from her seven-year-old spelling,” she said.

“I am smart about this stuff. I have a degree in early childhood studies. Our family focuses on and promotes healthy eating and healthy bodies. Our attitudes are reasonable and balanced. Weight has never been an issue in our home - it is, for the most part, irrelevant.”

She blames the media for influencing her daughter’s self-consciousness.

“I am tired of the beauty and body obsessed arena we live in. I am tired of women being portrayed as objects to be saluted and admired or shunned and shamed depending on whether they measure up to societies idealistic standards.”

When she asked her daughter how she learned about diets, she said she learned it from one of her classmates who had created a similar plan.

She spoke to her about diets and healthy bodies, but she knows this isn’t the last time she will have to have that talk with her.

“I am not naive. I know this will not be the last time I talk about food and weight and bodies with my daughter. I am just ultra p*ssed that it had to start when she was seven.”