Man Loses Leg To Flesh-Eating Bacteria

| by Michael Howard
Brian ParrottBrian Parrott

A Houston man had his right leg amputated and remains in intensive care after he reportedly contracted a flesh-eating bacteria infection.

On June 12, Brian Parrott, 50, took his family to a beach in Galveston, Texas, where he spent several hours in the water, KHOU reports. Two days later he started to feel ill and began vomiting. Then he noticed sores on his leg.

He was eventually taken to LBJ Hospital, where doctors amputated his leg from the knee down.

His mother, Donna Dailey, described the horrifying experience to KRIV.

"You go swimming with your family on Sunday, you go to work on Monday, you have a red leg on Tuesday, Wednesday you have boils on your leg, Thursday you lose the leg," she said.

Doctors are uncertain exactly how Parrott contracted the bacteria, but they speculated that it was through a wound on his foot.

"And because he's diabetic, he may have had a scratch on his foot [and] everything was right for it," Dailey said.

A Galveston Health Department spokesperson said flesh-eating bacteria live in coastal waters, according to KHOU. A person may become infected after an open wound is exposed to contaminated water, but it is most often spread by eating undercooked shellfish.

"The problem I have is [Parrott] didn't know about it," Dailey told KHOU. "If [his family] had known about it, they surely wouldn't have put [my] great-grandkids or his grandkids [in the water]."

"We want to get the word out, and that's the main thing," she told KRIV. "There's nothing more that we can do for my son, but maybe we can save somebody else."

The Galveston Health Department has recorded two cases of flesh-eating bacteria infection in 2016: one from food and the other from an open wound, KHOU reports.

There were reportedly eight infections in 2015, and nine in each of the previous two years.

Parrott's infection will reportedly put an end to his career as a security guard.

"Today, he made the statement, 'I don't know how much more of this I can take,'" Dailey told KHOU.

"I'm wanting to know if he's going to live," she added.

Sources: KRIV, KHOU / Photo Credit: KRIV, KHOU

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