Health

Schoolgirl Dies After Inhaling Deodorant Fumes (Photo)

| by Alex Scarr

A 12-year-old girl from the U.K. died after she accidentally inhaled fumes from aerosol deodorant.

Paige Daughtry died on a family vacation after she inadvertently inhaled "volatile fumes" from her spray-on deodorant, according to LadBible. The family had noticed that Paige sprayed the deodorant like it was "going out of fashion," but never thought it posed a direct danger to her health.

Paige was found unresponsive outside the bathroom of the vacation home where the family was staying. The concentration of the spray inside a confined area is thought to have led to her death.

The local coroner classified the accident as "death by misadventure," and did not believe the inhalation of the fumes to be intentional or a sign of chronic use, reports The Telegraph.

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"This is the unintentional consequences of a deliberate act," coroner Alan Wilson said. "Paige was inhaling the fumes from the deodorant but what she didn't intend is the consequences."

"It's most likely that inhaling those fumes has most probably led to her heart rhythm being affected and led to her death."

The specific toxins Paige was known to have inhaled were butane and isobutane, according to reports.

The Drug and Alcohol Office for the Government of Western Australia states on its website that butane is one of the most harmful volatile gasses of which humans interact.

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"Spraying directly into the mouth can cause the larynx to go into spasm, blocking off the air supply to the lungs and causing suffocation. This is because propellant gasses, when released, are at an extremely low temperature," a list of guidelines regarding butane read.

"She would spend hours in the bedroom and would spray and spray as she didn't want to smell," her mother Ann said, according to The Sun. "She used to spray it in small rooms and I used to tell her off."

"I suppose that's something every 12-year-old girl would do, spraying deodorant. But she was overusing deodorant -- it was more than we would have expected any girl to put on."

"But there was never a point when we started to think there was an issue -- not in the way we would have thought she was doing any sniffing or anything like that," said Ann Daughtry. "There were no indications whatsoever, I would have noticed."

In January 2016, a 16-year-old boy died from inhaling gasses from an aerosol deodorant can, according to The Sun. Police found as many as 42 cans of deodorant in the teen's room. His mother claimed he used "a can a week" in lieu of showers.

Sources: The Sun (2), The Telegraph, DAO, LadBible / Photo credit: Robert Howie/FlickrCavendish Press via The Sun

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