Politics

Poll: GOP Voters Support Food Stamp Cuts for the Poor

| by Michael Allen

The recent cut in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), or as it is commonly known "food stamps," dropped the daily money for food stamps to less than $1.40 a meal.

While this cut has placed millions of poor families in a tight bind and stretched food banks to the breaking point, the reduction has been met with overwhelming approval by most Republican voters.

A new poll by The Huffington Post and YouGov, shows that 67 percent of GOP voters approve of the recent cuts, with only 25 percent opposing.

Democrats opposed the food stamp cuts by 67 percent, with only 28 percent approving. Independent voters had 48 percent opposing and 40 percent approving the cuts.

The Nov. 1 cut happened because President Obama's 2009 stimulus plan added $5 billion to the program, but that money has now run out.

According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, here's a breakdown of how the food stamp cuts will affect children, seniors and people with disabilities:

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The benefit cut will affect all households that receive SNAP, the majority of which include children, seniors, or people with disabilities. Nationally, more than 21 million children -- that is, more than 1 in 4 of all children -- live in a household that receives SNAP.At least a quarter of children receive SNAP benefits in more than 30 states and the District of Columbia; in some states, this figure is more than 40 percent. November's SNAP cut for households with children will total $3.5 billion in the remaining 11 months of fiscal year 2014. Similarly, more than 9 million seniors and people with disabilities receive SNAP. Their households will experience a $1.2 billion benefit cut over the same period.

Sources: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and The Huffington Post