Consumer watchdogs took aim at children's breakfast cereals, which they claim would be better placed next to chocolate cookies on supermarket shelves. Extremely high sugar content and minimal nutritional value were apparently to blame for the group's critique, according to Daily Mail.

The "Which?" watchdog group's report claimed that, "Cereals aimed at children were particularly disappointing, with high levels of sugar found in 12 out of 14 cereals, meaning that many would be more at home in the biscuit (cookie) aisle."

Medical professionals blame high-sugar foods targeted at children are responsible for tooth decay and the rising obesity epidemic.

"Parents will be particularly surprised by the fact that the majority of children's cereals contain so much sugar. Overall, 32 out of 50 cereals were high in sugar, including several that are marketed as healthy or slimming options such as Kellogg's Special K," said Richard Lloyd, Executive Director of the "Which?" watchdog group.

Lloyd's group asserts that companies are using dishonest labeling practices to mislead consumers.

Out of the brands tested, Nestle's Shredded Wheat ranked as the healthiest children's cereal, while Kellogg's Frosted Flakes came in last. Frosted Flakes has 37 grams of sugar per 100-gram serving of cereal -- or the equivalent of 7.4 teaspoons of sugar.