Health

Fox News' Sean Hannity Doesn't Trust Obama's Pro-Vaccination Advice (Video)

| by Michael Allen
Screen Capture.Screen Capture.

Fox News host Sean Hannity declared on his show last night that “parents should have the choice” on whether or not to vaccinate their children.

Hannity said he did get his kids vaccinated, but added that he wouldn't trust President Barack Obama on whether or not to vaccinate his children, noted MediaMatters.org (video below).

"Now, I got my kids vaccinated, but I believe parents should have the choice," said Hannity.

Hannity's guest Dr. Eric Braverman complained there was an “overreliance" on vaccines to prevent diseases, but then called for an "universal vaccine" to prevent diseases.

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Dr. Marc Siegel, another guest, reminded Hannity that a child with HIV would not be able to have the measles vaccine and therefore would get infected by a child whose parents simply chose not to have him or her vaccinated.

Braverman stated that "vaccines don’t always work,” and then suggested that "brain, emotions, junk food and heat" contributed to the recent measles outbreak at Disneyland.

"I'm not trusting President Obama to tell me whether to vaccinate my kids, by the way," added Hannity.

Over on CBN, televangelist Pat Robertson longed for his childhood when people endured the mumps and measles, and voiced his opposition to the government forcing children to undergo vaccinations, noted RightWingWatch.org.

Robertson said:

“I’m sure that there’s some serious consequences to measles and perhaps vaccination is the answer, but I don’t think any parent should be forced by the government to vaccinate. There's so many vaccinations. There was a vaccination against polio and I know the mother of a friend contracted polio from the vaccine, so all vaccines are not benign. But, so far, this one about whooping cough and diphtheria and measles has been very effective and I think it was a good thing to do, and so why not. But the problem is, natural immunity is a pretty good thing and if you have some of these diseases when you’re a kid you have immunity the rest of your life.”

Sources: MediaMatters.org, RightWingWatch.org / Image Credit: Fox News Screenshot