Health

Mom Upset: Daughter Vaccinated By School To Prevent Cancer-Causing Virus (Video)

| by Michael Allen

The HPV vaccine prevents a sexually transmitted virus that can lead to various forms of cancer.

However, Michelle Miller is upset that her 16-year-old daughter, Noel, was vaccinated for HPV inside a nurse's van at a school in Chicago (video below).

Miller claims she signed consent forms to have her daughter undergo a sports physical at school, but not three of the four immunizations that the girl received.

"When I looked at that, I flipped out," Miller told CBS Chicago.

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The teen was vaccinated for chicken pox, Hepatitis A, meningitis and HPV.

Miller claims that all the vaccinations, except for the chicken pox, were given by a nurse from the Norwegian-American Hospital without her consent.

A spokesperson for the hospital claims there is a signed consent form for every student exam and each vaccination, but Miller denies this and is filing complaints with the school and school board.

According to Illinois law, girls older than 12 can consent to the HPV vaccination because it falls under reproductive health. However, Miller says her daughter did not consent.

CBS Chicago failed to ask Miller why she didn't want her daughter to have the potentially lifesaving HPV vaccine, which is recommended for boys and girls at age 11 or 12.

According to the Centers for Disease Control web site:

This vaccine is for protection from most of the cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is a very common virus that spreads between people when they have sexual contact with another person. About 14 million people, including teens, become infected with HPV each year. HPV infection can cause cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers in women and penile cancer in men. HPV can also cause anal cancer, mouth/throat (oropharyngeal) cancer, and genital warts in both men and women.

Sources: CBS Chicago, Centers for Disease Control
Image Credit: CBS Chicago Screenshot