Stacy Erholtz has suffered from myeloma, a blood cancer for ten years, but she has finally been successfully treated thanks to a very high dosage of the measles virus.

Doctors at the Mayo Clinic, led by Dr. Stephen Russell, injected 100 billion units of the measles virus into Erholtz in an experimental treatment.

Erholtz had previously tried chemotherapy and stem cell transplants, but a tumor was growing in her forehead and was dangerously close ot her brain.

After the measles shot, she immediately experienced headaches, vomiting and high temperatures.

“Thirty-six hours after the virus infusion was finished, she told me, ‘[The tumor] has started shrinking,’” Dr. Russell told The Washington Post.

After a few weeks, the forehead tumor and other tumors in Erholtz's body were gone.

“It’s a very simple concept,” Dr. Russell said on a video released by the Mayo Clinic (video below), noted “Viruses naturally come into the body and they destroy tissue."

“What this all tells us is something we never knew before, we never knew you could do this in people. It’s a very important landmark because now we know it can happen. It’s a game changer. And I think it will drive a development in the field.”

Dr. Russell wrote in the medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings that the measles virus was re-engineered to attach itself to the cancer tumors, which killed the cancer cells.

However, another patient this treatment was tried on did not get the same cure, so more clinical tests will have to be done.

In 2013, team at the Institute of Cancer Research in London found that the measles virus could be used to help fight bowel, head and neck cancers, noted

Sources: The Washington Post,,