Health

No Porn! Simi Valley Proposes Condom Law

| by Mark Berman Opposing Views

Officials in Simi Valley, California fear a new law in neighboring Los Angeles could send porn production their way, so they are pushing for a similar measure to keep the industry out.

A law goes into effect in Los Angeles on Monday requiring performers to wear condoms. Porn producers fought the law and are threatening to move out of the San Fernando Valley, the capital of adult productions.

Simi Valley is just over the hill, and lawmakers there don't want the multi-billion dollar industry in their sleepy neighborhood.

"The bottom line is we don't want to be known as the porn capital of the world," Mayor Bob Huber told the Los Angeles Times.

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So he is pushing for a similar condom law. The Simi Valley law would go even further than Los Angeles' -- it would require producers to hire on-set medical officials to ensure condom use, as well as send unedited footage to police so civilian employees could screen it for possible violations.

"I am amused at the thought of Simi Valley hiring people to sit around and view porn on taxpayer dollars," said Diane Duke, executive director of the Free Speech Coalition, a porn industry trade association. "I wonder what the training for that would look like."

Duke said the proposal is pointless because she doesn't think producers are flocking to Simi Valley for filming.

And that's just fine with members of the Simi Valley City Council.

"We should let the porn industry know it's not welcome in Simi Valley." said Councilman Steve Sojka. However he did add, "But to pass an ordinance requiring them to police themselves to wear condoms is a waste of tax resources."

Violating the law would carry a $1,000 or six months in jail, although lawmakers agree judges are not likely to send anyone to jail.

"Five years and a million-dollar fine would get their attention," said Councilwoman Barbra Williamson. "I'm sorry we can't do that, but I wish we could."