Health

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Praises 'Origami Condoms' for Unique Design

| by
article imagearticle image

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is praising a small business in California called Origami Condoms which has invented a new condom designed to improve sensation.

While condom manufacturers have always tried to make the contraceptive appealing by using different textures and flavors, Origami Condoms are unique in that they have a completely unexpected design.

They are folded up instead of rolled, and come out in an accordion-style. They are said to be loose-fitting sheath, enabling it to move with the body naturally.

Its creator believes that the design will make both partners experience more sensation.

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Danny Resnic, the owner of Origami Condoms, said he has the attention of many sexual health proponents and latex condom manufacturers who want to license the design.

As Bill and Melinda Gates challenged the public to create a better, more appealing condom, they discovered Origami Condoms and praised it as a leading innovator for sexual health.

"Origami Condoms provides an excellent example of a private enterprise focused on new condom design to promote consistent use by emphasizing the sexual experience," a blog post read. 

Bill and Melinda Gates recently announced they would offer $100,000 to innovators who are able to drastically change the condom and make it more appealing.

"The latex condom was strictly protection. No one liked using it," Resnic said.

"We are trying to create a condom that feels great and is much closer to the real deal to encourage people to use them."

Origami Condoms are made from super-supple silicone rather than latex, allowing it to be folded and able to withstand more movement without tearing.

Resnic knows the dangers of condom tearing firsthand, as in 1993, he was infected with HIV after a condom broke. That was what prompted him to start looking into a condom redesign. 

In clinical testing, Resnic said the condom could also be put on much faster, at an average of three seconds. 

Though the condoms are still being tested, they are expected to be available for purchase in early 2015. 

Resnic has not set a price for the condoms but said they will probably cost more than traditional ones.

"Our focus is on making condom experience more pleasurable than anyone imagined possible," he said. "We almost didn't want to call it a condom."

Sources: Daily Mail, Huffington Post