20-Year-Old Fighting Cervical Cancer Says Doctors Told Her She Had 'Growing Pains'

| by Lisa Fogarty
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A 20-year-old girl knew something was wrong with her health when she continued to experience inexplicable stomach pains – but it took some convincing to get a doctor to take her seriously.

Kirstie Wilson says several doctors told her three years ago that her stomach cramps were nothing more than growing pains, reports the Mirror. But even after the third time a doctor told her the pain wasn’t serious, Wilson says she begged to see a specialist.

About four months from the day she first visited a doctor, Wilson was finally given a smear test – and it was discovered that the then-17-year-old girl had cervical cancer.

"I had all the symptoms of cervical cancer but because I was 17 years old at the time doctors ignored my concerns,” Wilson told the Mirror. "I was bleeding in-between between periods and I was in agony but doctors diagnosed me with thrush and growing pains.”

Wilson’s cancer has now reportedly spread to her liver and spleen and the chemotherapy is no longer effective in shrinking her tumors. When she was first diagnosed in May 2012, the young Kent, England, woman had her cervix removed and lived cancer-free for nearly two years.

But in April 2014, Wilson realized her stomach was bloated to the point where she appeared to be pregnant. She visited a doctor, received a biopsy, and heard the worst news of her life: her cancer had returned and spread.

Doctors reportedly say that, even though Wilson was diligent and received regular smear tests, the cancer was likely too small to be spotted.

When doctors discovered the chemo wasn’t working this time around, Wilson didn’t give up. She reportedly underwent a research medical trial at the University College London Hospital and is receiving experimental drugs.

In the meantime, this strong young woman has raised over £6,000 ($9,000) for Cancer Research and continues to give back to charities. She is also raising awareness for the need for smear tests if a patient exhibits symptoms of cervical cancer – no matter how young she may be.

Wilson is expected to receive a CT scan this month to determine whether the new treatment is working.

Source: Mirror/Photo Credit: Mirror, Shutterstock