Has the veneration of sports figures gone too far?

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Has the veneration of celebrities clouded society's judgement?

This is an update from the Big Ben Story.  I first took the angle of why the media was giving preferential treatment to Big Ben.  I thought maybe race had something to do with it.  It turns out, that maybe the cops in Georgia may have been star struck.  How would you feel if you were bringing charges against someone and you looked in the paper and saw them taking chummy pictures with the police.  

Actually the same investigator who took your complaint is seen huddled up with Big Ben in a classic celebrity-celebrity fan style photo.  It did not help that this same cop filed a sparse police report that did not initially name Big Ben as the culprit.  The police chief of the Milledgeville PD came out with the company line that he was not bothered by these photos.  You have uniformed police mixed with off-duty police taking photos with a man who hours later would be accused of sexual assault.  How would you feel!

I can't imagine how a woman would feel knowing that the Good ole' boy system may be ready to protect the status quo.  It's no wonder that women have a hard time reporting these incidents to police, whom many see as gatekeepers rather than protectors.  Granted, this is a bad example that shines a bad light on the cops, but instead of protecting their own, cops should speak up and say: This is not protocol!  When discrepancies happen among police, there is a tendency to remain silent out of respect to the officer.  

This leads to bad PR for the cops.  It is almost akin to the dreaded street code of "Don't Snitch", common among criminals, rappers, and unfortunately our youth.  I am mature enough to know that not all cops operate like this, but it sure does look bad.  And if Big Ben is found not guilty, it cast a suspicious light on the whole affair.  If there is a trial, it may have to be moved.  Don't worry, I won't suggest Augusta as an alternate location, although it is tempting.