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Has "Golden-Voiced" Ted Williams Really Turned Life Around?

| by Mark Berman Opposing Views

Well, the feel-good portion of Ted Williams' story may be over. You know, Ted. He shares the same name as a deceased Boston Red Sox great -- and he's the homeless man who became an Internet and TV sensation thanks to his "voice from God."

An Ohio business manager, who claims to have had recent trouble with Williams, is not happy about Williams's new-found fame.

The 53-year-old Williams was discovered on a highway in Columbus, and a video posted of the former radio announcer and his distinctive voice landed Williams a job offer from the Cleveland Cavaliers and an appearance on network TV.

After years abusing drugs and alcohol, Williams says he has been sober for the past two years. However, according to a report on the Web site The Smoking Gun, the manager of a tire store claims, “He’s basically been a thief for the past two years.”

The man who identified himself only as Dan said he is "a little aggravated" by the notoriety Williams is getting. He said he had to call the police on Williams and a female companion this past July because they were “refusing to leave the business property” and had become an “ongoing problem” for the business, according to a police report.

The Smoking Gun wrote:

While Williams begged customers for money, the woman “gets picked up and dropped off in the parking lot by various and numerous males in different vehicles. The management had repeatedly asked the two suspects to stay off the property and have been cussed and yelled at by the suspects for their effort.”

Dan claims that he's seen Williams break into cars and steal things from them in a neighboring parking lot.

The report also quotes law enforcement records that tally a lengthy rap sheet for Williams over the past two decades, including arrests for theft, robbery, escape, forgery, and drug possession.

This is not to say that Ted Williams can't be the first heart-warming story of 2011. But it does say that we should reserve judgment for just a little while.