Drug Law

Georgia Becomes Latest State to Outlaw Fake Marijuana "K2"

| by Mark Berman Opposing Views

People in Georgia hoping to get around drug laws by using a synthetic marijuana are out of luck -- the fake stuff is now illegal as well. Governor Sonny Perdue signed a bill on Monday to outlaw the use and sale of synthetic marijuana.

The product goes by the brand names "K2" or "Spice." The compound was created by an organic chemist named John W. Huffman in the mid-1990s

to mimic the effects of marijuana on the brain to study cannabinoid receptors. But along the way people started using it as a substitute for marijuana. A legal herb is coated with the synthetic compound, and then it is smoked.

Huffman is dead set against that, and has come out to plead with people not to use it, saying the substance might be toxic. Even the makers of K2 acknowledge possible problems -- each package comes with a warning sticker that says "Not for Human Consumption."

Georgia joins Kansas, Alabama and Kentucky in outlawing the drug. Missouri and Tennessee have passed bans that will take effect unless their governors veto them, and Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan, New Jersey and New York are considering similar bans.